VETO 2011, FARSIDE team bonuses


BONUS 1
Olfactory/gustatory bonus: Omit if no spices available.
[[ HAND OUT FOUR SAMPLES OF SPICES ]]
You've just been given samples of four different spices, labelled "A" through "D". Name each spice, for 5 points for one, 10 points for two, 20 points for three, or 30 points for all correct. I'll give you a total of sixty seconds for this bonus, and here is a big hint: all of the answers begin with the letter "C".

Answers:
A. CUMIN
B. CORIANDER
C. CINNAMON
D. CAYENNE pepper


BONUS 2
Auditory bonus: Omit if no working audio.
I'll play you an excerpt from a performance of a musical work, After you hear it, name the singer for 5 points, and the song for 5 points. You'll get an extra 5 points if you can name both the singer and the song.

[[ Click here to play audioFARSIDE.mp3 ]]

Answers:  William (Alan) SHATNER,
LUCY IN THE SKY WITH DIAMONDS

For 5 points for one, or 15 for both, name the Beatles album on which "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" originally appeared, and Shatner's first album, from which the excerpt you heard was taken.

Answers:  SERGEANT PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND,
The TRANSFORMED MAN


BONUS 3
[[ Click FARSIDE-visual.pdf or HAND OUT PAGE SHOWING THREE PAINTINGS ]]
The Vancouver Art Gallery is currently displaying what it boasts is "the most comprehensive exhibition of Surrealist art ever to be shown in this country". I've just handed you copies of three Surrealist paintings that are not in the exhibit. Name the artists, for 5 points each, and the titles of the works, for 5 points each. For these six answers, I'll give you a total of 30 seconds.

Answers:
A. Marc (Zakharovich) CHAGALL,
I AND THE VILLAGE (or MOI ET LE VILLAGE)
B. René (François Ghislain) MAGRITTE,
The HUMAN CONDITION (or La CONDITION HUMAINE)
C. Salvador (Domingo Felipe Jacinto) DALÍ (i Domènech, Marquis de Púbol),
GALATEA OF THE SPHERES (or GALATEA DE LAS ESFERAS, or GALATEA DE LES ESFERES)


BONUS 4
Pencil and paper ready. If you were at the International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics at the Vancouver Convention Centre last week, you would have heard about the common patterns of numerical computation known as Colella's Seven Dwarfs. These are: dense linear algebra; (pause) sparse linear algebra; (pause) spectral methods; (pause) N-body methods; (pause) structured grids; (pause) unstructured grids; (pause) and Monte Carlo methods. Given the name of an algorithm, tell me which of Colella's seven dwarfs it corresponds to, for ten points each:

A. Gaussian elimination

Answer:  DENSE LINEAR ALGEBRA

B. The Metropolis algorithm

Answer:  MONTE CARLO methods

C. The Fast Multipole Method

Answer:  N-BODY methods


BONUS 5
Answer these questions about Canadian treaties with other countries. Ten points each.

A. In 1923, the Canadian government negotiated and signed its first treaty independently of Britain. This treaty with the United States was about the management of what natural resource?

Answer:  HALIBUT (or HIPPOGLOSSUS) (prompt for "more specific" on "FISH")

B. Kofi Annan once said that "Perhaps the single most successful international agreement to date has been the Montreal Protocol." Signed in 1987 and since ratified by 196 countries, the Montreal Protocol dealt with the phasing out of production of what substances?

Answer:  ChloroFluoroCarbons (also accept HydroChloroFluoroCarbons)

C. The Ottawa Treaty of 1997, ratified by 156 countries, prohibits "the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of" what?

Answer:  anti-personnel (land) MINEs


BONUS 6
For 10 points apiece, I'll give you a misquoted line of English poetry, and you tell me the single-word substitution required to make the quotation correct.
(Host: read slowly, and enunciate clearly.)

A. From "An Essay on Criticism" by Alexander Pope:
"A little knowledge is a dangerous thing."

Answer:  "A little LEARNING is a dangerous thing"

B. From "Ulysses" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson:
"To strive, to seek, to fight, and not to yield."

Answer:  "To strive, to seek, to FIND, and not to yield."

C. From "Terence, This Is Stupid Stuff" by A.E. Housman:
"And malt does more than Milton can; To justify God's will to man."

Answer:  "To justify God's WAYS to man"


BONUS 7
Answer these questions about recent unrest in Syria. Ten points each.

A. The uprising began on March 15 in this small southern city where thousands of people held peaceful protests against emergency laws, and security forces responded by opening fire on them.

Answer:  DERAA

B. On May 15 and again on June 6, Israeli soldiers shot protesters trying to enter this region of Syria that's been occupied by Israel since 1967.

Answer:  the GOLAN HEIGHTS (or HADBAT AL-JAWLAAN or MURTAFA'AAT AL-JAWLAAN)

C. Though most Syrians are Sunni Muslims, President Bashar al-Assad is a member of this Islamic sect that makes up twelve per cent of the country's population.

Answer:  ALAWIte


BONUS 8
For 10 points each, I'll describe a Canadian city's designated Chinatown, and you name the city. None of the answers is Vancouver or Toronto.

A. It extends from Rochester Street to Bay Street along Somerset Street, and includes Canada's first Chinese Royal Arch.

Answer:  OTTAWA, Ontario

B. You enter it via the Gate of Harmonious Interest at the corner of Government and Fisgard Streets. Between Fisgard and Pandora Avenue lies Canada's narrowest street, Fan Tan Alley, ninety centimetres wide at its narrowest.

Answer:  VICTORIA, British Columbia

C. Located north of Fourth Avenue South and between Second Street West and Macleod Trail, it contains a Chinese Cultural Centre modeled after the Temple of Heaven in Beijing.

Answer:  CALGARY, Alberta


BONUS 9
Answer these questions about electric batteries.

A. The first battery was the voltaic pile made by Alessandro Volta. It was in a brine solution and consisted of alternating disks of, for 5 points each, what two metals?

Answers:  COPPER and ZINC

B. The majority of batteries bought by Canadian consumers are of the alkaline type invented by Canadian Lewis Urry in the 1950s. These batteries are called "alkaline" because they contain an electrolyte of an aqueous solution of, for 10 points, what alkaline compound?

Answer:  POTASSIUM HYDROXIDE (or CAUSTIC POTASH. Do not accept merely "POTASH")

C. In alkaline batteries, the anode is made of zinc, and for 10 points, the cathode is made of an oxide of what metal?

Answer:  MANGANESE


BONUS 10
For 10 points apiece, name the present-day African country where each of these events happened.

A. In 1622, under Jesuit influence, Emperor Susenyos converted and made Roman Catholicism the official state religion. A ten-year civil war followed, ending with the abdication of Susenyos and disestablishment of the Catholic church.

Answer:  ETHIOPIA

B. The British Empire lost three wars, in the 1820s, the 1860s, and the 1870s, against the Ashanti Union in what is now this country.

Answer:  GHANA

C. From 1904 to 1907, German colonial authorities conducted a genocidal campaign resulting in the deaths of more than half of the Herero and Nama peoples in this present-day country.

Answer:  NAMIBIA


BONUS 11
A. The paradox named after him is:
"Yields falsehood when preceded by its quotation" yields falsehood when preceded by its quotation.
-- which is a paradox because it's true if and only if it's false. For 10 points, name this American philosopher.

Answer:  Willard Van Orman QUINE

B. For 10 more points, in what 1951 paper does Quine argue against the belief in a fundamental cleavage between analytic and synthetic truths, and against the belief that every meaningful statement is equivalent to a logical construct upon terms referring to immediate experience?

Answer:  TWO DOGMAS OF EMPIRICISM

C. In the book Word and Object, Quine gives this example of an expression a linguist might hear an informant say when a rabbit scurries by, which could mean "rabbit", "lo, a rabbit", "animal", "white", or "undetached parts of rabbits". For 10 points, what is this made-up word in a made-up language?

Answer:  GAVAGAI


BONUS 12
The title refers to actors in old-style drama and opera companies who played "Those roles which, being neither those of Hero nor Heroine, Confidante nor Villain, but which were nonetheless essential to bring about the Recognition or the denouement."
For 10 points each:

A. What is this 1970 Canadian novel?

Answer:  FIFTH BUSINESS

B. Name the narrator of Fifth Business.

Answer:  Dunstan (or Dunstable) RAMSAY

C. Name Dunstan Ramsay's fictional hometown, which is also the name of Robertson Davies' trilogy of novels together with The Manticore and World of Wonders.

Answer:  DEPTFORD


BONUS 13
For 10 points each, name these men from the Bible, from how they acquired their wives.

A. The book of Genesis says that he worked seven years in order to marry his boss's daughter, but then he got tricked into marrying her older sister, so he worked seven more years to marry the daughter he really wanted.

Answer:  JACOB

B. According to the book of this minor prophet, The LORD said to him, "Go, take unto thee a wife of whoredoms and children of whoredoms: for the land hath committed great whoredom, departing from the LORD. So he went and took Gomer the daughter of Diblaim."

Answer:  HOSEA

C. In the book of Judges, he told his parents he had seen a woman and told them to "get her for me to wife", but his parents objected, so "after a time he returned to take her".

Answer:  SAMSON


BONUS 14
For 10 points each, give these words that appear in the Criminal Code of Canada. Hint: They all begin with the same letter.

A. Section 162(1)(a) says "Every one commits" this offence "who, surreptitiously, observes -- including by mechanical or electronic means -- or makes a visual recording of a person who is in circumstances that give rise to a reasonable expectation of privacy, if the person is in a place in which a person can reasonably be expected to be nude, to expose his or her genital organs or anal region or her breasts, or to be engaged in explicit sexual activity."

Answer:  VOYEURISM

B. Section 179(1)(a) says "Every one commits" this offence "who supports himself in whole or in part by gaming or crime and has no lawful profession or calling by which to maintain himself."

Answer:  VAGRANCY

C. In the Definitions section of Part Eight, "Offences against the person and reputation", the entry for this word doesn't actually give a primary meaning but says it "includes a machine designed to derive support in the atmosphere primarily from reactions against the earth's surface of air expelled from the machine."

Answer:  VESSEL


BONUS 15
On July twenty-third, 1986, a member of the royal family got married in Westminster Abbey.
A. For 10 points, who is this person who would have been celebrating a silver anniversary today if the marriage had lasted?

Answer:  Prince ANDREW (Albert Christian Edward), Duke of York

B. Prince Andrew and his wife Sarah had two children, who attracted attention for their outfits at this year's wedding of their cousin William. Name both princesses, for 5 points each.

Answers:  Princess BEATRICE (Elizabeth Mary) of York,
Princess EUGENIE (Victoria Helena) of York

C. For 10 points, during her ten-year marriage to Prince Andrew, Sarah wrote seven books featuring what fictional little helicopter?

Answer:  BUDGIE


BONUS 16
For 10 points each, questions about the federal election on May 2, 2011.

A. This party fielded sixty-one candidates who won a total of nineteen thousand votes, the most of any party that failed to elect any members. What is this party whose slogan is "the right conservatives"?

Answer:  CHRISTIAN HERITAGE party

B. Only three parties elected enough members to have official party status in the House of Commons. What is the minimum number of MPs a party must have in order to obtain this parliamentary status?

Answer:  TWELVE (12)

C. In this least populous federal riding of all, Conservative Peter Penashue scored an upset win over Todd Russell, getting four thousand two hundred and fifty-six votes, fewer than one tenth as many as Stephen Harper in Calgary Southwest. What is this former Liberal stronghold previously represented by Bill Rompkey and Lawrence O'Brien?

Answer:  LABRADOR


BONUS 17
In the twenty-fourth and twenty-third centuries B.C., he conquered the Sumerian city-states and formed an empire from the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean Sea. For 10 points each:

A. Name this ruler.

Answer:  SARGON (the Great)

B. Name the city that Sargon made his capital, but has not been found by archaeologists.

Answer:  AKKAD (or AGADE)

C. Sargon dedicated the city of Akkad to his divine patron, who was what goddess of love and war?

Answer:  INANNA (or ISHTAR or ASTARTE)


BONUS 18
Pencil and paper may be helpful here. Answer these questions about the optics of mirrors. Ten points each.

A. A concave spherical mirror has a focal length of twenty centimetres. An object that's sixty centimetres away forms an image that's how far away from the mirror? I'll give you fifteen seconds.

Answer:  30 (THIRTY) CENTIMETRES
(Prompt for "more specific" if "CENTIMETRES" not mentioned.)
(Note: Equation is: 1/(focal length) = 1/(object distance) + 1/(image distance) )

B. By what factor is the image magnified compared with the size of the original object? I'll give you fifteen seconds.

Answer:  one HALF (0.5)
(Note: This is ratio of image distance to object distance.)

C. A concave mirror that focuses light rays from all directions to a single point has what three-dimensional shape?

Answer:  circular PARABOLOID, or PARABOLOID OF REVOLUTION
(Prompt on "PARABOLIC", and do not accept "PARABOLA")


BONUS 19
Name these works written by Stendhal, for 10 points each.

A. Julien Sorel, an ambitious son of a carpenter, has an affair with his boss's wife, Madame de Rênal, then another affair with a later boss's daughter, Mathilde de la Mole. Mathilde's father the Marquis ennobles Julien so he can marry Mathilde, but changes his mind when Madame de Rênal sends him a letter denouncing Julien. Tragedy ensues.

Answer:  The RED AND THE BLACK (or Le ROUGE ET LE NOIR: Chronique de 1830)

B. Young Italian aristocrat Fabrice del Dongo joins the priesthood, and after many affairs and intrigues, he kills a man and is imprisoned. Fabrice falls in love with his jailer's daughter, Clélia Conti, who helps him escape. Fabrice is acquitted and Clélia marries a different man chosen by her father, but Clélia and Fabrice still love each other. After she dies, Fabrice spends the rest of his days in a monastery.

Answer:  The CHARTERHOUSE OF PARMA (or La CHARTREUSE DE PARME)

C. In this essay, Stendhal makes an analogy to a journey from Bologna, representing indifference, to Rome, representing what he calls "crystallization".

Answer:  ON LOVE (or DE L'AMOUR or OF LOVE)


BONUS 20
At four thousand and ninety-five metres, Mount Kinabalu is the twentieth highest peak in the world. For 10 points each:

A. On what island is Mount Kinabalu located?

Answer:  BORNEO (do not accept KALIMANTAN)

B. Mount Kinabalu is in this Malaysian state, with its capital at Kota Kinabalu.

Answer:  SABAH

C. From Pulau Banggi, in the northernmost part of Sabah, you can see the island of Balabac, in the Palawan province of what neighbouring country?

Answer:  the PHILIPPINES


BONUS 21
For 10 points each, name these European royal houses.

A. Originally from Aargau, Switzerland, this royal house ruled over Spain until 1700, and Bohemia, Hungary and Austria until the twentieth century.

Answer:  House of HABSBURG

B. Grand Duke Henri of Luxembourg and King Juan Carlos of Spain are the only currently reigning monarchs belonging to this royal house that originated in tenth-century France.

Answer:  House of BOURBON (accept CAPETian)

C. The current Queen of Denmark and King of Norway are members of this royal house, originally from North Germany, that until the twentieth century also included the Kings of Greece and, in its Romanov branch, the Tsars of Russia.

Answer:  House of OLDENBURG


BONUS 22
This is the last bonus of the packet, and it's about diarrhea. For 10 points each:

A. Worldwide, diarrhea used to be the number one cause of death for children under the age of five. But now diarrhea is second in this age group to what other ailment?

Answer:  PNEUMONIA
(Note to people who give other answers: Pneumonia kills more children than AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined.)

B. The most common cause of diarrhea in young children is what kind of virus, for which Health Canada approved an oral vaccine in 2006?

Answer:  ROTAVIRUS

C. If your diarrheal excretions contain visible red blood, then you've got what medical condition?

Answer:  DYSENTERY


Vancouver Estival Trivia Open, 2011, FARSIDE team