VETO 2008, FARSIDE team bonuses

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BONUS 1
[[ HAND OUT PAGE SHOWING MUSICAL SCORE ]]
You've just been handed a page showing the score for an aria of an opera.

A. For 10 points, name the opera. You have 15 seconds.

Answer:  CARMEN

B. For 10 more points, give the one-word title of this aria sung by Carmen.

Answer:  HABANERA

C. For 5 points, in what musical key is this written?

Answer:  D MINOR

D. For 5 points, what is the type of chord that is circled?

Answer:  MINOR MAJOR SEVENTH (do not accept major minor seventh)


BONUS 2
[[ HAND OUT PAGE SHOWING TARTANS ]]
You've just been handed a page showing twelve Scottish tartans. I'll name four of them, and you give me the number corresponding to each. You'll get 5 points for one, 10 points for two, 20 for three, and 30 for all correct.

A. Rob Roy

Answer:  11 (ELEVEN)

B. Burberry

Answer:  2 (TWO)

C. Royal Stewart

Answer:  12 (TWELVE)

D. the official provincial tartan of either British Columbia or Ontario: your choice, but you'll have to say which one

Answer:  1 (ONE) for B.C.;
7 (SEVEN) for Ontario.

(If anyone's curious, the others are: (3) Elliot; (4) Fraser of Lovat; (5) MacCorquodale; (6) MacLeod; (8) Pride of Scotland; (9) Shepherd; (10) Black Watch.)


BONUS 3
[[ HAND OUT PAGE SHOWING BATTLE MAPS ]]
You've just been handed a page showing maps of three battles that all took place in the 19th century and had names beginning with the letter "B". Name them, for 10 points each. You have 15 seconds.

Answers: 
1. battle of BATOCHE (1885)
2. battle of BALACLAVA (1854)
3. battle of BORODINO (1812)


BONUS 4
[[ HAND OUT PAGE SHOWING LITERARY EXCERPTS ]]
You've just been handed a page showing the first page of three novels by Margaret Atwood. Name the novels, for 10 points each. You have 15 seconds.

Answers: 
A. ORYX AND CRAKE
B. The ROBBER BRIDE
C. ALIAS GRACE


BONUS 5
[[ HAND OUT PAGE SHOWING DOT PATTERN ]]
You've just been handed a cloud plot of an atomic orbital. For 10 points per answer:

A. This orbital is denoted by what letter?

Answer:  p (also accept 2p)

B. Altogether, what's the maximum total number of electrons that can occupy the p orbitals in a single shell?

Answer:  SIX (6)

C. What is the lightest element that has any p orbitals; or if you don't know that, then tell me instead for 5 points what atomic number it has.

Answers:  BORON — for 10 points; or 5 (5) — for 5 points


BONUS 6
[[ HAND OUT PAGE SHOWING SATELLITE IMAGES ]]
You've just been handed a page showing satellite images including three independent island nations and their adjacent mainland. For 5 points per answer, name those island nations and mainland countries marked A through F. You have 15 seconds.

Answers: 
A. Republic of MOZAMBIQUE
B. Republic of MADAGASCAR (or MALAGASY REPUBLIC)
C. Kingdom of BAHRAIN
D. State of QATAR
E. MALAYSIA
F. Republic of SINGAPORE


BONUS 7
[[ HAND OUT PAGE SHOWING SCULPTURE ]]
You've just been handed a page showing a sculpture. For 10 points per answer:

A. Who is the central figure depicted?

Answer:  LAOCOON

B. According to the Aeneid, Laocoon incurred the divine punishment shown here because of something he said. What was the nature of what he said?

Answer:  he WARNed the Trojans about the TROJAN HORSE, or about GREEKS bearing GIFTS, or equivalent

C. Ancient accounts name Laocoon as a Trojan priest of one of two gods. Name either god.

Answer:  APOLLO or POSEIDON (or NEPTUNE)


BONUS 8
[[ HAND OUT PAGE SHOWING TOOLS ]]
You've just been handed a page showing pictures of three tools. Each tool has a monosyllabic name in English. Give those monosyllabic words, for 10 points each. You have 15 seconds.

Answers: 
A. HOD
B. ADZe
C. LAST


BONUS 9
For 10 points each, give these women's names that originated from literature in English.

A. Richard Blackmore invented this name for the title character of a romance published in 1869, set in seventeenth-century England.

Answer:  LORNA (Doone)

B. Philip Sidney coined this name for the heir to Arcadia in The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia in the 1590s. Greek for "all sweetness", the name was also used by Samuel Richardson in 1740 for the title character of his epistolary novel about "a beautiful young damsel".

Answer:  PAMELA

C. Jonathan Swift made up this nickname for a girl he tutored, Esther Vanhomrigh. He wrote a poem referring to her by this name and to himself as Cadenus.

Answer:  VANESSA


BONUS 10
Fifty years ago today, the prime minister of a newly independent Commonwealth nation arrived in Canada on an official visit. For 10 points, who was this leader of the pan-Africanist movement who was voted "African of the Millennium" by BBC World Service listeners in 1999?

Answer:  Kwame NKRUMAH

For 10 more points, Kwame Nkrumah was prime minister from independence in 1957, then president until deposed by an American-backed coup in 1966, of what country?

Answer:  Republic of GHANA

For a final 10 points, as a British colony from 1821 until independence, Ghana was known by what name?

Answer:  the GOLD COAST


BONUS 11
Open? Closed? Compact? For 5 points for one, 10 points for two, 20 for three, and 30 for all four correct: I'll describe four subsets of the real numbers, and you tell me whether the set is open, whether the set is closed, and whether the set is compact.

A. the interval from zero to one, EXcluding the endpoints zero and one.

Answer:  OPEN (and NOT closed, NOT compact)

B. the interval from zero to one, INcluding both endpoints zero and one.

Answer:  CLOSED and COMPACT (and NOT open)

C. the set of all real numbers

Answer:  OPEN and CLOSED (and NOT compact)

D. the set of numbers of the form one over N, for N a positive integer, together with the number zero.

Answer:  CLOSED and COMPACT (and NOT open)


BONUS 12
High food prices have led to riots around the world this year. Name these countries for 10 points each.

A. In March, a shortage of subsidized bread resulted in long lines in which fights broke out and ten people died. The subsidized price for a loaf of bread here is 5 piastres, or nine-tenths of a Canadian cent.

Answer:  Arab Republic of EGYPT (or Gumhuriyyat MISR al-'Arabiyyah)

B. In April, riots here led to five people dying, including a UN peacekeeper, and the country's Senate dismissing Prime Minister Alexis.

Answer:  Republic of HAITI

C. Twenty thousand textile workers in the town of Fatullah rioted in April after this country's government said that the price of rice had doubled over the previous year because of devastating floods and November's Cyclone Sidr.

Answer:  People's Republic of BANGLADESH


BONUS 13
Give these Marxist terms, 10 points each.

A. Anything which through ownership generates ongoing income for the owner, such as factories, mines, agricultural land, banks, and commercial enterprises.

Answer:  MEANS OF PRODUCTION (or PRODUKTIONSMITTEL)

B. A social class typified by small shopkeepers and self-employed artisans, who by combining both employment and ownership of the means of production, delude themselves into thinking that they represent a solution to the class struggle.

Answer:  PETITe BOURGEOISie (do NOT accept or prompt on just BOURGEOISie)

C. A group defined by Marx as "the scum, the leavings, the refuse of all classes", including "swindlers, confidence tricksters, brothel-keepers, rag-and-bone merchants, organ-grinders, beggars, and other flotsam of society", seen as a counter-revolutionary force.

Answer:  LUMPENPROLETARIAT


BONUS 14
This Radio-Canada program ran from 1972 to 1997 as a trivia tournament among teams of secondary-school students. For 10 points per answer:

A. Name this francophone equivalent of Reach for the Top.

Answer:  GÉNIES EN HERBE

B. Each year since 1999, veterans of Génies en Herbe have had a weekend-long "rendez-vous estival" with a turnout far eclipsing VETO. What is it called?

Answer:  PALÉOGÉNIES

C. The word Paléogénies shares a hybrid quality with what other word that prompted C.P. Scott, holder of a classics degree from Oxford and owner of the Manchester Guardian newspaper, to say in the 1920s: "The word is half Latin and half Greek. No good can come of it."

Answer:  TELEVISION


BONUS 15
Give the titles of these works by Friedrich Nietzsche. Ten points each.

A. In this, his first book, Nietzsche argues that dramatic art is the result of a conflict between "Apollonian" forces desiring order, and "Dionysian" forces desiring dissolution of boundaries.

Answer:  The BIRTH OF TRAGEDY, Out of the Spirit of Music (or Die GEBURT DER TRAGÖDIE aus dem Geiste der Musik)

B. This book imitates the Bible in its style and discusses a higher mode of being, the Superman, who would look down at ordinary men the way ordinary men look down at apes. Only the Superman can accept the doctrine of eternal return, that everything repeats itself.

Answer:  THUS SPOKE ZARATHUSTRA, A Book for All and None (or ALSO SPRACH ZARATHUSTRA, Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen), or THUS SPAKE ZARATHUSTRA, A Book for All and None

C. This book berates earlier philosophers for their naďveté and denies a universal morality, arguing that "We must compel moralities first and foremost to give way before the order of rank."

Answer:  BEYOND GOOD AND EVIL, Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future (or JENSEITS VON GUT UND BÖSE, Vorspiel einer Philosophie der Zukunft)


BONUS 16
Pencil and paper may be useful here.

A. For 5 points, what is the molecular weight of hydrogen gas, to the nearest whole number in grams per mole?

Answer:  2 (TWO)
(hydrogen is diatomic)

B. For 5 points, what is the molecular weight of oxygen gas, to the nearest whole number in grams per mole?

Answer:  32 (THIRTY-TWO)
(oxygen is diatomic)

C. For 10 points, if it takes one minute for a certain volume of hydrogen gas to effuse through a small hole, how long will it take for the same volume of oxygen gas to effuse through the same hole at the same temperature and pressure? I'll give you 15 seconds to answer.

Answer:  4 MINUTES
(Use Graham's law: multiply the time for hydrogen by the square root of the ratio of molecular weights of oxygen to hydrogen.)

D. In the Manhattan Project, Graham's law of effusion was used to separate isotopes of uranium. For 10 points, the uranium was in what compound that is a gas above fifty-six degrees Celsius?

Answer:  URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE or U F 6


BONUS 17
Let's take a trip across the Trans-Canada Highway, from west to east. For 10 points per answer:

A. You cross from B.C. into Alberta at this mountain pass, also used by the original C.P.R. line. On the Royal Canadian Air Farce, Dave Broadfoot had a character who was Member of Parliament for this riding.

Answer:  KICKING HORSE PASS (NOT Rogers Pass: that's in B.C. only)

B. Later, you pass through North Bay, Ontario, which lies on a bay of what lake?

Answer:  Lake NIPISSING

C. In Nova Scotia, you drive over the world's deepest causeway to get to Cape Breton Island. The causeway, sixty-five metres deep, fills what strait?

Answer:  Strait of CANSO


BONUS 18
Winston Blackmore leads a controversial polygamist community in B.C.'s Creston Valley.

A. For 10 points: With its name taken from a place in the Book of Mormon having "much fruit, and also wild honey", what is their settlement called?

Answer:  BOUNTIFUL, British Columbia

B. For 10 more points: For twenty years until he was excommunicated in 2002, Blackmore was the local bishop of what Utah-based church?

Answer:  FUNDAMENTALIST CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS (prompt on "Fundamentalist Church of Latter-Day Saints", but do NOT prompt on or accept any answer that does not include the word FUNDAMENTALIST)

C. For 5 points: In B.C. — or, if you prefer, in Ontario — what is the minimum legal age to get married WITHOUT parental consent?

Answer:  19 in B.C., or 18 in Ontario

D. For 5 points: In B.C. — or, if you prefer, in Ontario — what is the minimum legal age to get married WITH written consent of both parents?

Answer:  16 (same in B.C. and Ontario)


BONUS 19
Name these places in ancient Egypt. Ten points each.

A. Twenty kilometres south of modern Cairo, it was Egypt's first capital, from about 3100 BC until 2200 BC.

Answer:  MEMPHIS (or INEB HEDJ, or MEN-NEFER)

B. The necropolis of Memphis, it includes the Step Pyramid of Djoser, which is the earliest known stone structure in the world, and fifteen other pyramids.

Answer:  SAQQARA

C. Capital of Egypt during most of the second millennium BC, this city in Upper Egypt contains the temple complexes of Karnak and Luxor.

Answer:  THEBES (or WASET or NIWET)


BONUS 20
For 10 points per answer:

A. Supply the seven-word line that follows these two lines of twentieth-century poetry:
"Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;"

Answer:  THINGS FALL APART; THE CENTRE CANNOT HOLD

B. Who wrote the lines I quoted?

Answer:  William Butler YEATS

C. What's the title of the poem?

Answer:  The SECOND COMING


BONUS 21
Questions about the ear, for 10 points each.

A. The eustachian tube extends from the middle ear to what part of the body outside the ear?

Answer:  THROAT or PHARYNX

B. The semicircular canals are balance organs in the inner ear. How many semicircular canals are there in each ear?

Answer:  3 (THREE)

C. Which lobe of the brain contains the primary auditory cortex?

Answer:  TEMPORAL lobe


BONUS 22
The land area of the world, including islands, is divided into seven continents: North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Antarctica, and Oceania, where Oceania includes Australia. For 10 points per answer:

A. Which continent has the smallest area?

Answer:  OCEANIA

B. As of 2007, which continent has the highest population density?

Answer:  ASIA

C. As of 2007, which continent has the most independent countries, with fifty-three?

Answer:  AFRICA


Vancouver Estival Trivia Open, 2008, FARSIDE team