1. American Literature

 

Who rejected a Pulitzer Prize in 1930 because he did not believe his books were wholesome enough? He first gained major success as a writer in 1920 with a novel about Carol Kennicott, who is ostracized from Gopher Prairie. Name this author of Our Mr. Wrenn, Dodsworth, Elmer Gantry, Main Street, and Babbit.

 

ANSWER: (Sinclair) Lewis (do not accept Sinclair)

 

2. Chemistry (30 Seconds)

 

Give your answer to one significant digit only. How many carbon atoms are in one kilogram of carbon?

 

ANSWER: 5 x 1025 (or Fifty Septillion) (do not accept 5 x 1022)

 

3. World History

 

About one hundred twenty-five thousand workers died in its construction, but because of debt the workers’ country soon sold its share to Great Britain. It was taken back, however, in 1956. Originally built from 1859 to 1869 and owned by France and Egypt, name this manmade waterway.

 

ANSWER: Suez (Canal)

 

4. Technology

 

In your answer, give the common term instead of anything that could be abbreviated FDR or CVR. These are double-wrapped in stainless steel or titanium with insulation. Newer ones have sonar so that they can be located. They use potentiometers attached to steel wire, and they also record audio. Name these objects usually located at the backs of airplanes that are now being recommended for cars. The same two-word phrase is used to describe something when you have no idea what is going on inside of it.

 

ANSWER: Black Box(es)

 

5. Language Arts

 

This nine-letter word comes from the Ancient Jewish practice of giving two animals to the High Priest; one would be sacrificed and the other would be set free. Today, this word refers to a person, group, or object which bears the blame for others.

 

ANSWER: Scapegoat

 

 

 

6. Algebra (10 Seconds)

 

What feature is often added to graphs of rational functions which have a numerator of equal or lesser degree than their denominator? This line shows what output value the function approaches as the input value approaches positive or negative infinity. The curve of the graph gets closer and closer to this line.

 

ANSWER: Horizontal Asymptote(s) (prompt on Asymptote)

 

7. Astronomy/Earth Science/Geography

 

Its most noteworthy spot is about two hundred miles Southwest of Guam, and it has been explored by the Trieste, the Kaiko, and The Challenger Deep. Name this feature which is about forty miles wide and seven miles deep.

 

ANSWER: Mariana Trench (accept Challenger Deep on early buzz, prompt on Mariana or trench)

 

8. Music

 

Early in his career, which composer went out of popular favor for criticizing Franz Liszt? He would later gain popularity with his ‘German Requiem’ and ‘Song of Triumph’. Name this composer who, despite four symphonies, two piano concertos, and a great influence on later composers, is probably best known for his Cradle Song.

 

ANSWER: (Johannes) Brahms

 

9. Religion/Mythology

 

During which five-day holiday do people worship Laksmi, the goddess of wealth? Its name translates into English as rows of lighted lamps. On the last day, people often recall Bali, an ancient Indian King. Name this Hindu festival.

 

ANSWER: Divali (or Diwali or Deepavali)

 

10. Biology

 

Which organ produces the hormone hPL, which causes a rise in blood sugar? Its full weight is a little over one pound, and its primary purpose is to filter blood. Unfortunately, it does not filter alcohol or most antigens. Name this temporary organ which exists in pregnant women.

 

ANSWER: Placenta (prompt on Afterbirth)

 

 

 

11. Calculus/Combinatorics (30 Seconds)

 

What is the value at x=pi/4 of the derivative of the function secant x?

 

ANSWER: Root 2

 

12. Nonfiction

 

Which essay begins: “It is a melancholy object to those who walk through this great town or travel in the country, when they see the streets, the roads, and cabin doors, crowded with beggars of the female sex, followed by three, four, or six children, all in rags and importuning every passenger for an alms.” It ends: “I have no children by which I can propose to get a single penny; the youngest being nine years old, and my wife past child-bearing.” Name this work by Jonathan Swift.

 

ANSWER: (A) Modest Proposal

 

13. Pop Culture

 

He was once called the Vince Lombardi of owners. Who said: "Winning is the most important thing in my life, after breathing. Breathing first, winning next"? Always mired in controversy, he made illegal contributions to the Nixon Presidential Campaign and once gave forty thousand dollars to a well-known gambler. Name this man who was heard but not seen on Seinfeld. He owns the New York Yankees.

 

ANSWER: (George) Steinbrenner

 

14. Physics (10 Seconds)

 

What is the only fundamental force that acts on its own exchange particles? The subject of quantum chromodynamics, it uses gluons to bind quarks together. These quarks combine together to form protons and neutrons inside the nucleus of an atom.

 

ANSWER: Strong (Nuclear Force or Interaction)

 

15. British Literature

 

Which novel is about a man named Victor telling his life story to an explorer named Robert Walton? The life story is terrifying, including an errant death sentence of a family friend for the murder of Victor’s brother. Name this 1831 work by Mary Shelley about a man who creates life.

 

ANSWER: Frankenstein(, or the Modern Prometheus)

 

 

 

16. American History

 

Who resigned as the Governor of Maryland in order to become Vice President? He was a vocal critic of the press and of Vietnam War protesters. His political career ended when he pleaded no contest to tax evasion and then quit the Vice Presidency in 1973. Name this Nixon Vice President.

 

ANSWER: (Spiro) Agnew

 

17. Art/Architecture

 

In his early teens, this painter broke both of his legs. Because they never healed properly, he only grew to be four-and-a-half feet tall. His heavy drinking affected his health as an adult, leading to his death in his late thirties. Many of his best-known works are portraits of the dancer Jane Avril or posters for the Moulin Rouge.

 

ANSWER: (Henri de) Toulouse-Lautrec

 

18. Geometry/Trigonometry (30 Seconds)

 

What is the cotangent of 630 degrees?

 

ANSWER: 0 (do not accept undefined or anything like it)

 

19. Current Events

 

She has described herself as an energy analyst for Brewster-Jennings and Associates, but that is not her real job. She was able to tell her real job to her husband only because he had a high-level security clearance. In 2002, she suggested that her husband should take a trip to Niger, where he discovered that Iraq was not trying to purchase yellowcake uranium. Name this wife of Joseph Wilson whose name was mentioned in a newspaper column by Robert Novak.

 

ANSWER: (Valerie) Plame (accept Plame Wilson, prompt on Wilson)

 

20. World Literature

 

Which famous poet lived much of his life at Avignon during the fourteenth century? Many of his works center around a woman named Laura who may not have been real. Name this famous writer of Italian sonnets.

 

ANSWER: (Francesco) Petrarch (or Petrarca)

 

 

 

 

Tiebreaker #1

 

(Note to moderator: Alceste has two syllables.) Which seventeenth century playwright created the character Alceste, who is involved in several lawsuits? Name this Frenchman who wrote The Flying Doctor, The Imaginary Invalid, The School for Wives, Tartuffe, and The Misanthrope.

 

ANSWER: Moliere (or (Jean-Baptiste) Poquelin)

 

Tiebreaker #2

 

Named after his father’s high school, who first gained fame as a sidekick to Joey Bishop? In 1983, he started cohosting The Morning Show with Cindy Garvey, but the show did not gain popularity until she was replaced with Kathie Lee Gifford. Kathie Lee has since been replaced by Kelly Ripa. Name this host of the prime time Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?

 

ANSWER: (Regis) Philbin (prompt on Regis)

 

Tiebreaker #3 (No Time Limit)

 

Unscramble the following letters to get the last name of a President: NNLLICO

 

ANSWER: (Abraham) Lincoln