Princeton University Buzzerfest Resurrection: Episode IV, A New Hope

April 21, 2001

Packet by Penn (Samer Ismail)

 

Tossups

1. The Hechingen and Sigmaringen branches attained princely rank in 1632, but surrendered their sovereign status in 1849. Its first ruler was Burchard I, and its modern name was first used during the reign of Frederick IX. The dynasty as a whole would lose sovereignity in the aftermath of World War I. For 10 points, name this dynasty, the chief ruling house of Brandenburg-Prussia and imperial Germany.

ANSWER: the Hohenzollerns

2. The most common amino acid in protamines, this non-essential amino acid was first isolated from animal horns in 1895. A primary component of the urea cycle, at pH 12, the extra proton present in its guanidine side chain at pH 7.4 is finally lost. For 10 points, name this amino acid, abbreviated in protein structures as “R.”

ANSWER: Arginine [AHR-zhuh-neen]

3. Located “across the Atlantic Sea,” [sic] this city, known as Mamucium in Roman times became dominant during the Industrial Revolution as a focal point for the local textile industry. Its history as a port city began in 1894 with the completion of a ship canal. Also known for its nearby coal industries, for 10 points, name this city of over 2 million people in northwestern England, famed for a much-reviled football team.

ANSWER: Manchester

4. A law student at Stanford, he was a clerk for Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas. He later served as deputy Attorney General under LBJ, and as deputy Secretary of State under Carter, for whom he was the main American negotiator in talks to end the Iranian hostage crisis. For 10 points, name this man, best known for serving as Secretary of State during Bill Clinton’s first term in office.

ANSWER: Warren Christopher

5. This work deals with the story of a handsome young man and his beautiful wife, who gradually degenerate into a shopworn middle age while they wait for the young man to inherit a large fortune. Ironically, when they finally receive it, there is nothing of themselves left worth preserving. FTP, name this 1922 portrait of the nouveaux riches [NOO-voh reech], which focuses on the exploits of Anthony and Gloria Patch, the second novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

ANSWER: The Beautiful and Damned

6. Increases in goal-directed activity. Excessive involvement in pleasurable activities with a high potential for painful consequences. Distractibility. Flight of ideas, or feeling that one’s thoughts are “racing.” Pressured speech. Decreased need for sleep. Inflated self-esteem. These are the symptoms defining, for 10 points, what psychiatric disorder, often seen as the opposite of depression?

ANSWER: mania or manic episode [prompt on “bipolar disorder”]

7. As a student at University College in London, while working with Sir William Ramsay, he discovered a substance which he named “radiothorium.” A chemical warfare specialist for the German army in World War I, after the war, he and an assistant discovered protactinium. For 10 points, name this Nobel Laureate for his discovery of nuclear fission, andthe namesake of a transuranium element, who has often been accused of overshadowing Lise Meitner.

ANSWER: Otto Hahn

8. "In the big world the old people do be leaving things after them for their sons and children, but in this place it is the young men do be leaving things behind for them that do be old." The young man in this case is Michael, whose body washed up in the far north of Donegal. The last of Maurya's (MOY-raz) sons, Bartley, will soon be drowned on his way to Connemara to sell the family's horse. FTP, identify this depressing one-act play by John Millington Synge.

ANSWER: Riders to the Sea

9. Tennyson described this figure as having “his rosy thigh/Half buried in the eagle’s down,/Sole as a flying shot through the sky/Above the pillared town.” According to Cretan legends, this son of Tros was abducted by Minos to serve the same role once held by Hebe on Mount Olympus, before she married Hercules. For 10 points, name this youth, abducted from Mount Ida by Zeus, to be cupbearer to the gods.

ANSWER: Ganymede or Ganymedes or Catamitus

10. This term is sometimes used to refer to the coastal hills of Algeria and to Tunisia’s steppelike eastern coastal plain. It is more commonly used, however, to refer to a shrinking band of semiarid land, often afflicted by drought and famine, that stretches from northern Senegal to The Sudan. For 10 points, name these transitional zone between the savannah of central and southern Africa and the Sahara desert.

ANSWER: Sahel [sah-HELL] or Sahil [sah-HEEL]

11. Three movements of this work, written in D major, were published as “Grand Hymns with Solo and Chorus Voices.” The Gloria ends with the choir singing the word “Gloria” in unison, a cappella. An allusion to the Napoleonic wars interrupts the Agnus Dei, on which the composer inscribed “From the heart—may it return—to the heart!” For 10 points, name this 1823 mass, Opus 86 by Beethoven.

ANSWER: Missa solemnis in D major or Solemn Mass in D major [prompt on “Opus 86”]

12. This journalist and novelist’s The Perfume of the Lady in Black was one of the earliest works to delve into psychoanalysis, notably Freud’s Oedipus complex. His The Mystery of the Yellow Room is the first known “locked-room” mystery. The creator of the detective and journalist Joseph Rouletabille [roo-leh-TUH-bee], for 10 points, name this influential mystery writer probably best known for his 1911 novel The Phantom of the Opera.

ANSWER: Gaston Leroux

13. Leaving his home for the mountains at age 30, the title character spends a decade in solitude. At the end of those ten years, he feels a change in his heart and addresses the sun in a short monologue. He hopes to descend to mankind and spread his wisdom, so that he might “again become a man.” For 10 points, name this aphoristic 1885 work by Friedrich Nietzsche which shares its title with a musical work prominent in 2001.

ANSWER: Thus Spake Zarathustra or Also Sprach Zarathustra

14. A 1913 German expedition led by Hans Reck excavated an enormous-ox like creature called Pelorovis (pe-lor-OH-vis). Other animal fossils found here include gorilla-sized baboons, clawed herbivores called chalicotheres, and Deinotherium (dee-no-THERE-ee-um), a type of primitive elephant. The more famous finds of robust australopithecines and Homo habilis were not uncovered until the 1950s. FTP, name this canyon in northern Tanzania, whose fossil beds were made famous by Louis Leakey.

ANSWER: Olduvai Gorge

15. Over a period of 5.8 years, its diameter varies between 600 and 870 million kilometers. John Herschel claimed to have seen a small irregularity in the brightness of this red supergiant. For 10 points, name this star whose name comes from the Arabic for “giant’s shoulder,” the brightest star in Orion.

ANSWER: Betelgeuse or Alpha Orionis

16. Though he finished third in the Heisman voting his senior year, 1994, he won the Unitas and O’Brian awards for top quarterback. Many say he got cheated out of that Heisman, but his team certainly got cheated out of the national championship, finishing 12-0 with a Rose Bowl win, but Nebraska was awarded the national title. Name this former Penn State quarterback, drafted 5th in 1995 by the Panthers, and now the starter for the New York Football Giants.

ANSWER: Kerry Collins

17. While the true form is rare, elements of this power have been seen in Kentucky coal mines in the early 1900s, the wages that VA hospitals pay nurses, collusion between sports team owners over free agency deals, and universities comparing notes to avoid bidding wars for top students. Those who have it face an upward-sloping factor supply curve, rather than being price takers. For 10 points, name this type of power that emerges when there is only one buyer for a given product.

ANSWER: monopsony power [muh-NAH-psuh-nee] or monopsonistic power

18. Some of the pessimism of his poetry, published in such collections as Last Poems and the posthumous More Poems, can be traced to his mother’s death on his twelfth birthday. Troubled by the realization of his homosexuality while a student at Oxford, matters worsened for this subject of Tom Stoppard’s The Invention of Love when he fell madly in love with a fellow student, a heterosexual athlete. For 10 points, name this poet of “To an Athlete Dying Young” and the collection A Shropshire Lad.

ANSWER: Alfred Edward Housman

19. Of God, he once wrote that “The need of a sparrow/Even this moves Thee.” His broken engagement influenced many of his writings, including Stages on Life’s Way. Philosophical Fragments tried to explain Christianity in a way that presupposed free will. More famous, though, than Philosophical Fragments is the appendix he wrote a year later, Concluding Unscientific Postscript. For 10 points, name this Danish author of Either/Or and Fear and Trembling.

ANSWER: Soren Aabye Kierkegaard

20. It is given by the polar equations x of theta = r times the quantity theta minus sine of theta, and y  of theta = r times the quantity one minus cosine of theta, for a circle of radius r. With a period of 2 pi times r, it is an extension of the brachistochrone, or curve of least time. For 10 points, name this mathematical curve traced by a point on the perimeter of a circle rolling along a straight line.

ANSWER: cycloid

OT 1. Born in 483 of peasant stock, he rose through government ranks quickly, mostly because his uncle was emperor. Adopted by his uncle, this man was a powerful influence in guiding his uncle’s policies. In 525, he received the title of Caesar, and in 527 was made co-emperor with the rank of Augustus. For 10 points, name this Byzantine emperor, noted for his reorganization of the imperial government and for sponsoring a codification of laws which bear his name.

ANSWER: Justinian I or Flavius Justinianus or Petrus Sabbatius

OT 2. Its earliest inhabitants were a Paleo-Indian culture around 8000 BC, and more recently, the Mississippian Indians, whose religious center was Cahokia. The first Europeans to arrive were the French, who controlled it until the French and Indian War, when it became a county of Virginia in 1778. Given the status of a territory after the division of the Northwest Territory in 1800, it achieved statehood in 1818. For 10 points, name this state whose cities include Cairo [KAY-roh] and Peoria.

ANSWER: Illinois

OT 3. Genevieve lives with her mother, who runs an umbrella store. She loves Guy [gee], a mechanic, who is called off to war shortly after Genevieve learns she is carrying his child. When she is forced to marry Monsieur Cassard to care for the child, Guy becomes heartbroken, but finds love with the nurse of his sickly aunt. Such is the plot of, for 10 points, what French New Wave film, in which every line of dialogue is sung?

ANSWER: The Umbrellas of Cherbourg or Les Parapluies de Cherbourg

Bonuses

1. Cronos and Rhea had six children, including that ingrate Zeus. Five for one, 10 for two, 20 for three, and 30 for four, name any four of their other five kids.

ANSWER: Demeter, Hades, Hera, Hestia, Poseidon

2. 30-20-10. Name the painter from works.

[30] Le Chahut [CHA-hoo], La Parade [pah-RAHD]

[20] The Circus, Young Lady Powdering Herself

[10] Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte

ANSWER: Georges Seurat

3. Answer these related questions, 10 points each.

[10] What 12-point scale, modified in 1931, describes the “felt intensity” of an earthquake?

ANSWER: modified Mercalli scale

[10] Unlike the Mercalli scale, what scale, invented by an American scientist in 1935, measures the magnitude of earthquakes?

ANSWER: Richter scale

[10] There is no theoretical lower limit to the Richter scale; sensitive recorders can record negative values for these small ground motions, that have amplitudes of 1/100,000 of a meter.

ANSWER: microseisms

 

4. Sometimes, you are guilty until proven innocent.

[10] In Britain, defendants charged with what crime must prove that the statements they have published represent the truth?

ANSWER: libel

[10] Deborah Lipstadt, author of Denying the Holocaust, was sued in British court by this man, whom she denounced in her book as a Holocaust denier.

ANSWER: David Irving

[10] The magazine Living Marxism was sued by a British TV network for libel for arguing that this US director of Big and A League of Their Own falsified footage of “death camps” in Serbia.

ANSWER: Penny Marshall

5. Given the victim, name the assassin, for the stated number of points.

[5] Archduke Franz Ferdinand

ANSWER: Gavrilo Princip

[10] James Garfield

ANSWER: Charles Guiteau

[15] Yitzhak Rabin [rah-BEAN]

ANSWER: Yigal Amir [ah-MEER]

6. Name these linguistic principles, 15 points each.

[15] This law describes changes in groups of consonants that took place once in English, and twice in German. As an example, some b sounds in proto-Indo-European became p in English and f in German.

ANSWER: Jakob Grimm’s law

[15] This change in the pronunciation of long, stressed English vowel sounds that took place between 1300 and 1600 led to the first serious efforts at “reformed” spelling. It also explains why Chaucer’s original poetry sounds so weird.

ANSWER: the Great Vowel Shift

7. Given a list of names, name these annoying groups of males, 10 points each.

[10] A.J., Nick, Howie, Brian, Kevin

ANSWER: The Backstreet Boys

[10] Eliphaz, Bildad, Zophar

ANSWER: Job’s comforters [accept equivalents]

[10] Tarpal, Boss Nass, Jar Jar Binks

ANSWER: Gungans

8. Given a quote, give the number of the Psalm from the King James Version of the Bible, 10 points each.

[10] “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.”

ANSWER: Psalm 23

[10] “I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills, from whence cometh my help.”

ANSWER: Psalm 121

[10] “Let everything that hath breath praise the Lord. Praise ye the Lord.”

ANSWER: Psalm 150

9. Answer the following about The Importance of Being Earnest, 10 points each.

[10] Jack Worthing’s friend, Jack finds out he is this man’s older brother.

ANSWER: Algernon Moncrieff (accept either)

[10] This idiotic governess lost Jack when he was but a baby.

ANSWER: Miss Laetitia Prism

[10] Miss Prism lost Jack when she accidentally left him, and not her manuscript, in a hand-bag. Where did she leave the handbag?

ANSWER: in a train station [accept equivalents]

10. 30-20-10. Name the country.

[30] Along this country’s coast lie Ramree Island, Cheduba Island, and Cape Negrais.

[20] Some of its lesser rivers include the Sittang, the Chindwin, and the Salween.

[10] The Irrawaddy River flows through this country’s central plains before entering the Bay of Bengal.

ANSWER: Myanmar [accept Burma]

11. Answer these questions about the song, “It’s The End of the World as We Know It (and I Feel Fine),” for the stated number of points.

[10] Who recorded the song?

ANSWER: REM

[20] Four 20th century figures are mentioned by name in the song, all of them with the initials L.B. Five points each, name them.

ANSWER: Leonard Bernstein, Leonid Brezhnev, Lenny Bruce, and Lester Bangs

12. Name these related conditions, 10 points each.

[10] It is usually defined as a body temperature over 40 degrees Celsius, or 104 degrees Fahrenheit.

ANSWER: hyperthermia [do not prompt on “fever”]

[10] In healthy young adults, this is the most common cause of hyperthermia, commonly associated with physical exertion in hot weather.

ANSWER: heat exhaustion

[10] Ingestion of this compound, abbreviated DNP, can uncouple oxidative phosphorylation from glycolysis. It could make you look like Kate Moss, albeit Kate Moss with a very high fever.

ANSWER: 2,4-dinitrophenol

13. Name these sites of multiple battles, 10 points each.

[10] In the first of two battles named for this Virginia locale, Confederate Generals Beauregard and Johnston defeated the Union forces led by Irvin McDowell.

ANSWER: Bull Run (Grudgingly accept: Manassas Junction)

[10] The first of two battles in this British city 30 km northwest of London was the first battle of the Wars of the Roses.

ANSWER: St. Albans

[10] The second of three World War I battles named for this Belgian city marked the first use of poison gas by the Germans.

ANSWER: Ypres [EE-pruh] or Ieper

14. Answer the following on the works of Henry James, 10 points each.

[10] “The Story of a Year” was the first James short story to appear in this magazine edited by William Dean Howells.

ANSWER: The Atlantic Monthly

[10] In this 1886 book, a conservative Southern male meets an embittered man-hating Northern suffragist.

ANSWER: The Bostonians

[10] James’s most famous novel is this 1878 story of an American flirt who dies in Rome.

ANSWER: The Portrait of a Lady

15. Answer these related questions, 10 points each.

[10] The Parliament Act of 1911 deprived the House of Lords of its right to do this.

ANSWER: veto legislation

[10] In the United States, the President can veto legislation simply by keeping it unsigned until Congress adjourns, a practice given this name.

ANSWER: pocket veto

[10] This unfortunate veto power given by the Polish legislature to its nobles allowed any one of them to dissolve the meeting and nullify any measures passed at that meeting. Therefore, like the Quakers, all actions had to be unanimous.

ANSWER: liberum veto or free veto

16. Given three or four US cities, arrange them in geographical order from west to east, 10 points per part.

[10] Las Vegas, NV; Phoenix, AZ; Santa Fe, NM

ANSWER: Las Vegas, Phoenix, Santa Fe

[10] Cleveland, OH; Detroit, MI; Indianapolis, IN; Toledo, OH

ANSWER: Indianapolis, Toledo, Detroit, Cleveland

[10] Austin, Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, all in Texas

ANSWER: San Antonio, Austin, Dallas, Houston

17. Identify the 20th century Russian authors from works, 10 each

[10] White Guard, Heart of a Dog, Master and Margarita

ANSWER: Mikhail Bulgakhov

[10] Lyubka the Cossack, Old Odessa, Red Cavalry

ANSWER: Isaac Babel

[10] Buddha’s Little Finger, The Life of Insects, Omon Ra, A Werewolf Problem in Central Russia and other stories

ANSWER: Victor Pelevin

18. Given a form of spectroscopy, state what is measured along the horizontal axis, either quantity or units, 10 points each.

[10] nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

ANSWER: chemical shift or delta or parts per million or ppm

[10] infrared (IR)

ANSWER: wavenumber or inverse centimeters [cm-1; prompt on “frequency”, do not prompt on “wavelength”]

[10] ultraviolet (UV)

ANSWER: wavelength or nanometers [nm; do not prompt on “frequency”]

19. Name these authors from works, 15 points each, or from a more famous play for 5.

[15] Watch on the Rhine, The Children’s Hour

[5] The Little Foxes

ANSWER: Lillian Hellman

[15] Private Lives, Design for Living

[5] Blithe Spirit

ANSWER: Noël Coward

20. Answer these questions about recent changes in the airline business, 10 points per part.

[10] All or nothing, name the two largest US airline carriers as of January 1, 2001.

ANSWER: United Airlines [#1], and American Airlines [#2]

[10] American became larger than United when it completed its merger with what other US carrier?

ANSWER: Trans World Airlines

[10] United will recapture the lead upon its planned merger with this airline.

ANSWER: USAir or US Airways

OT 1. Name these members of Abraham Lincoln’s cabinet, FTPE.

[10] The Ohio native and Secretary of the Treasury who later served as Chief Justice of the United States.

ANSWER: Salmon P. Chase

[10] Lincoln’s second Secretary of War. Andrew Johnson’s attempt to remove him from office led to that president’s impeachment.

ANSWER: Edwin Stanton

[10] The Secretary of State who is better remembered for purchasing Alaska.

ANSWER: William Seward