1998 Cardinal Classic

Tossups written by St. Valentine’s Day Massacre

 

(Sports)

Tossup: 1. In the mid-‘80s, he left sports announcing to run a real estate business. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1985, thirteen years after being named MVP of Super Bowl VI, and 22 years after winning the Heisman trophy as a junior, at Navy. For 10 points—name this four-time NFL passing leader for the Dallas Cowboys.

ANSWER: Roger (Thomas) STAUBACH

(Science)

Tossup: 2. It disappeared in 1994, only to reappear in the northern hemisphere a few months later, showing that the atmosphere undergoes rapid changes. The new version is about 15,000 kilometers across and moves westward at about the same speed as its predecessor. For 10 points—name this Neptunian feature, darker and roughly half the size of its more famous counterpart on Jupiter.

ANSWER: GREAT DARK SPOT

(Geography/Current Events)

Tossup: 3. Thirty-five miles north of Guadeloupe and 27 miles southwest of Antigua, it remains a British colony with capital at Plymouth. Its population had been estimated as 12,200 in 1994, but by mid-1997 only about 4,000 remained. For 10 points—name this east Caribbean island whose southern half is now covered by the ash and rock of more than two years of volcanic eruptions.

ANSWER: MONTSERRAT

(Literature)

Tossup: 4. Published in 1932, the writing is by John G. Neihardt, from the autobiographical dictation of another man. It tells of boyhood battles against the U.S. Army, going to Europe with Buffalo Bill, and concludes with an account of the massacre at Wounded Knee. For 10 points—name this "Life Story of a Holy Man of the Oglala Sioux."

ANSWER: BLACK ELK SPEAKS

(Literature)

Tossup: 5. Ravished by the Bulgarian army, she was eventually purchased from a brothel by a rich Jew of Lisbon, where she also caught the eye of the Grand Inquisitor and arranged to service them on alternate days. For 10 points—name this heroine saved by her longtime suitor, only to be captured by Barbary pirates, and then finally redeemed by Candide in Constantinople.

ANSWER: CUNEGONDE

(History)

Tossup: 6. He was killed in 1882 at the age of 35 by Robert Ford—twenty years after he joined a band of Confederate guerillas led by William C. Quantrill, and six years after his gang was shattered by a failed bank robbery in Northfield. For 10 points—name this American outlaw famed for his hideout in Meramac caverns.

ANSWER: Jesse (Woodson) JAMES

(Science)

Tossup: 7. Its magnitude is given by the J operator applied to a wave function and it is quantized in units of h bar. It is usually divided into two parts, one of which is equal to the position operator crossed with the momentum operator, while the other, denoted S, is intrinsic to the particle. For 10 points—name this physical quantity with orbital and spin components.

ANSWER: ANGULAR MOMENTUM

(Fine Arts)

Tossup: 8. By using such figures as Leonardo, Bramante, and Michelangelo as models for, respectively, Plato, Euclid, and Heraclitus, it links the accomplishments of the Renaissance to ancient glories. The meeting place in which the philosophers appear is based on Bramante’s design for the new St. Peter’s in Rome. This panegyric is—for 10 points—what great Vatican fresco painted by Raphael?

ANSWER: The SCHOOL OF ATHENS

(General Knowledge)

Tossup: 9. Heads of stags crossing a river, a curious unicorn-like creature that may be mythical, three huge auruchs with twisted horns, and multiple red deer mixed with oxen and horses—all adorn this site in the Dordogne region of France. For 10 points—name this preserve of Aurignacian culture in which 15,000 year-old cave paintings were found.

ANSWER: Grotte de LASCAUX or LASCAUX Grotto (prompt if someone buzzes early with "cave paintings" or equivalent)

(Philosophy)

Tossup: 10. Translated into Anglo-Saxon by Alfred the Great, it is formulated as a dialog between Lady Philosophy and the author, a prisoner in a dungeon near Milan. Neo-Platonic or stoic in outlook, the work was widely influential throughout the Middle Ages—though its imprisoned author was eventually executed. For 10 points—name this 6th century work by Boethius.

ANSWER: Concerning the CONSOLATION OF PHILOSOPHY or De CONSOLATIONE PHILOSOPHIAE

(Social Science)

Tossup: 11. In its classic form it asserted that workers' pay stays naturally at a level only high enough for survival. While Ricardo admitted the possibility of exceptions, other subsistence theorists denied it. For 10 points—name this "ferrous" mainstay of 19th century economic thought.

ANSWER: IRON LAW OF WAGES (accept SUBSISTENCE theory before "subsistence theorists")

(Science)

Tossup: 12. Its new formulation will release a bright blue dye when immersed in liquid, turning even dark drinks murky and causing particles to float noticeably to the top. This will not affect those who use it to treat severe sleep disorders, but may prevent it from being surreptitiously slipped into drinks to assist in sexual assault. For 10 points—name this Hoffman-LaRoche product known as the "date-rape drug."

ANSWER: ROHYPNOL or FLUNITRAZEPAM (prompt on "date-rape drug," "roofies," or "roaches")

(Geography)

Tossup: 13. Located on the Gulf of Guinea, its principal rivers are the Bénoué, Nyong, and Sanaga. After World War I, France and Britain were each given mandates over part. For 10 points—name this former German colony whose largest city is Douala, though its capital is at Yaoundé.

ANSWER: Republic of CAMEROON

(Science)

Tossup: 14. This chemical, found in pet foods, tomatoes, grapefruits, mushrooms, and Parmesan cheese, triggers "umami" (pronounced oo-MAM-ee), the newly-discovered fifth taste buds of the human mouth. It is the salt of an amino acid that was declared safe as a flavor-enhancer in 1995 by the government. For 10 points—name this additive thought to cause "Chinese Restaurant Syndrome."

ANSWER: MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE or MSG

(Current Events)

Tossup: 15. Its ethnic tensions were showing recently when opposition leader Mishake Muyongo charged that Ovambo women, famous for their beer brewing, deliberately get Nama men too drunk to go to work, so their Ovambo husbands can take their jobs. For 10 points—name this country independent since 1990, where President Sam Nujoma and the SWAPO party govern from Windhoek.

ANSWER: NAMIBIA

(Current Events)

Tossup: 16. In his midyear 1997 report to Congress he speculated that high-tech investments have given the economy greater capacity for non-inflationary growth—optimism coming only a few months after he warned the country about the "irrational exuberance" of financial markets. For 10 points—name this successor to Paul Volcker as chairman of the Federal Reserve.

ANSWER: Alan GREENSPAN

(Pop Culture)

Tossup: 17. "You are standing in an open field west of a white house, with a boarded front door. There is a small mailbox here." So begins an epic quest involving a jewel-encrusted egg, an elvish sword which glows blue when monsters are near, and a maze of twisty passages all alike. For 10 points—identify this first of a series of text adventure games from Infocom.

ANSWER: ZORK I (prompt on DUNGEON before "series of text adventures…")

(History)

Tossup: 18. Convened by the British Board of Trade in the face of a war threat, it brought together commissioners from seven colonies and the Iroquois nations, and adopted a plan of joint responsibility for defense, Indian relations, and regulation of frontier settlement. For 10 points—name this 1754 congress at which Ben Franklin drafted his famous Plan of Union.

ANSWER: ALBANY Congress

(Sports)

Tossup: 19. Its first recipient, in 1967, was Dwight Eisenhower, who qualified at Army in 1915. Bob Dole is it’s most recent recipient. Given annually to a citizen of outstanding accomplishment who earned a varsity athletic award in college, it is the highest honor bestowed upon on individual by the NCAA. For 10 points—this award is named for what Harvard boxer of the Class of 1880, instrumental in forming in the NCAA in 1906, and who also happens to be the 26th President of the U.S.?

ANSWER: Theodore ROOSEVELT Award or TEDDY Award

(General Knowledge)

Tossup: 20. Supposedly the Indian sage Qaflan intended his invention to represent a year: the 30 pieces were the days of the months, the 24 spikes were the hours of the day, and the two dice were day and night. For 10 points—name this popular board game whose modern name comes from the fact that pieces "sent to the bar" are required to go back and circuit the entire board again.

ANSWER: BACKGAMMON

(General Knowledge)

Tossup: 21. You need to have at least a two-octave range to sing the soprano solo in this part of Mozart’s Mass in C Minor (K. 427). This two-word phrase is not only the title of a piece by Mozart; it also appears as the first two words of a 1986 Mr. Mister chorus, being followed by "down the road that I must travel." FTP, name this phrase, which first appeared in the Septuagint as the Greek for "Lord, have mercy."

ANSWER: KYRIE ELEISON

(Religion-Myth-Classics)

Tossup: 22. Consisting of 15 books of hexameter verse, its stories, told in chronological order from the creation of the world to the deification of Julius Caesar, are mostly retellings of Greek mythology, and are linked by the presence in each of some sort of transformation. For 10 points—identify this Latin collection of myths and legends authored by Ovid.

ANSWER: METAMORPHOSES (do not accept Metamorphosis, which is a story by Kafka)

(Social Science)

Tossup: 23. He held that in complex societies the loss of commonly held values leads to social instability, individual disorientation, and an accompanying loss of morale—the alienated state he called "anomie," and which he suggested was an important factor in suicide. For 10 points—name this French sociologist and author of Le Suicide.

ANSWER: Émile DURKHEIM

(History)

Tossup: 24. He was somewhat more liberal and internationalist than his predecessor as President, under whom he served at various times from 1944 until his dismissal in 1968 following the May student-worker revolt. Nonetheless, he was easily elected president the following year, following de Gaulle's resignation. For 10 points—name this second president of the Fifth Republic.

ANSWER: Georges (-Jean-Raymond) POMPIDOU

(Literature)

Tossup: 25. Born in Austria with the maiden name "Gessner," she died in Kenya in 1980, murdered in her home by tribesmen. It was while living there in the 1960s with her third husband, a British game warden, that she made her name with a series of books about a lioness named Elsa. For 10 points—who was this author of Born Free?

ANSWER: Joy ADAMSON

(Literature)

Tossup: 26. "It was a queer, sultry summer, the summer they electrocuted the Rosenbergs, and I didn't know what I was doing in New York." So begins this introspective novel about Esther Greenwood, published in 1963 by "Victoria Lucas," a pseudonym for the real author, who committed suicide a month later. For 10 points—name this only novel by Sylvia Plath.

ANSWER: The BELL JAR

(Current Events)

Tossup: 27. The campaign she coordinated from her home in Putney, Vermont, bore fruit in September 1997 in Oslo, when a document was ratified by delegates from 89 countries. A few weeks later, also in Oslo, announcement was made that—for 10 points—what antiwar activist and coordinator of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize?

ANSWER: Jody WILLIAMS

(Pop Culture)

Tossup: 28. Bambi Woods and her high school friends are obsessed with the idea of joining the Texas Cowgirl Cheerleaders. To that end they form "Teen Services" and set about earning the money to make the trip. If this plot sounds weak, you should see the sequel in which Bambi discovers that her aunt’s ranch is actually a cathouse. For 10 points—name this pornographic movie which drew its Johns from Texas’s second largest city.

ANSWER: DEBBIE DOES DALLAS

(Current Events)

Tossup: 29. This man, says accuser Michel Slitivsky, "was not an executioner. . . . But with a fountain pen, you can do things that are even worse." France has recently been riveted by his Bordeaux trial for crimes against humanity. For 10 points—name this former budget minister who, as a Vichy official, may have signed warrants transporting some 1500 Jews to German and Polish death camps.

ANSWER: Maurice PAPON

(Religion-Myth-Classics)

Tossup: 30. The Egyptian goddess Nut took the form of this animal when she bore Ra up to the sky. The Egyptian personification of the sky, Hathor also was represented as this, or as a woman with this animal's head. In Hinduism, the Rgveda refers to this animals as Devi (pronounced: DEH-vye), Sanskrit for goddess. For 10 points—identify this animal symbolizing the maternal and the nourishing to the Egyptians, the killing of which is a high sin in Hinduism.

ANSWER: COW

(History)

Tossup: 31. He escaped harm from Mohammed Mehmedbasic (pronounced meh-MET-baysh-itch), who didn’t throw his bomb because a policeman stepped too close to him. A little later, Nedjelko Cabrinovic (pronounced cha-BRIN-oh-vich) did throw his bomb, but the target deflected it. For 10 points—name this target whose luck didn't hold, shot later in the day by Gavrilo Princip.

ANSWER: FRANZ FERDINAND, Erzherzog von Österreich-Este or FRANCIS FERDINAND, Archduke of Austria-Este

(Fine Arts)

Tossup: 32. Traditionally played in Japan at the end of the year, it served as the theme of the post-Soviet Unified Team at the 1992 Olympic games, and is used by a fictional futuristic society in the brainwashing of ultra-violent teenagers like Alex and his droogs. For 10 points—name this choral symphony played upon the dismantling of the Berlin wall as an ode to joy and freedom.

ANSWER: Ludwig van BEETHOVEN'S NINTH Symphony, op. 125 (prompt on "Choral Symphony")

 

Packet by St. Valentine's Day Massacre

(Katy Beebe, R. Robert Hentzel, Eric Hillemann, Steve Jenkins)

BONUSES

(Pop Culture)

Bonus: 1. Given a character or characters from a British television show popular as an export to the U.S., name the show, for 10 points apiece.

A. Jim Hacker MP, Sir Humphrey Appleby, and Bernard Woolley

ANSWER: YES MINISTER or YES PRIME MINISTER

B. Lofty, Wicksy, and Dirty Den

ANSWER: EASTENDERS

C. Basil, Sybil, Manuel, and Polly

ANSWER: FAWLTY TOWERS

 

(Literature)

Bonus: 2. 30-20-10. Identify the literary first name.

30: It belongs to Walpole's villainous Prince of Otranto from The Castle of Otranto.

20: It belongs to a Byronic title hero doomed by the reflection that man is "half dust, half deity, alike unfit to sink or soar."

10: It is also the real first name of Snoopy’s nemesis when he flies his Sopwith Camel.

ANSWER: MANFRED

 

(Religion-Myth-Classics)

Bonus: 3. For 10 points each—answer these questions relating to the Greek hero Achilles:

A. Achilles came to Troy leading the 50 ships of what warrior people of Phthiotis (Ph thee OH tis) in Thessaly?

ANSWER: MYRMIDONs

B. Achilles withdrew from the war to sulk, when Agamemnon took from him what captive princess?

ANSWER: BRISEIS

C. King Priam is killed, and the son of Hector hurled from the walls of Troy, by what brave but cruel son of Achilles?

ANSWER: NEOPTOLEMUS (also accept PYRRHUS)

(General Knowledge - Mixed Subject)

Bonus: 4. 30-20-10. Identify the surname.

30: Gilbert was an 18th century English naturalist, and author of The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne.

20: Edward was the first southerner to become Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Civil War.

10: Stanford was a prominent architect, killed in 1906 by the jealous husband of showgirl Evelyn Nesbit, with whom Stanford had an affair.

ANSWER: WHITE

 

(General Knowledge)

Bonus: 5. For the stated number of points—answer the following questions about the White House:

A. For 5 points—its location on Pennsylvania Avenue is directly opposite what square, named for a hero of the American Revolution?

ANSWER: LAFAYETTE Square

B. For 10 points—the White House’s principal designer was what Irish-born architect?

ANSWER: James HOBAN

C. For 15 points—what landscape architect, named for Andrew Jackson, planned the grounds, not only for the White House, but also for the Capitol and the Smithsonian Institution?

ANSWER: Andrew Jackson DOWNING

 

(Pop Culture)

Bonus: 6. Given a cinematic scene involving a famous American landmark or area, identify the movie, for 10 points each.

A. From 1985: a vicious fight between hero and villain atop the Golden Gate Bridge.

ANSWER: A VIEW TO A KILL

B. From 1959: a vicious fight between hero and henchmen on the face of Mouth Rushmore.

ANSWER: NORTH BY NORTHWEST

C. From 1991: the title characters commit suicide by driving their car off of a canyon in Monument Valley.

ANSWER: THELMA & LOUISE

(General Knowledge - Mixed Subject)

Bonus: 7. For the stated number of points—answer these related questions:

A. In a 1961 speech, government official Newton N. Minow referred to what—for 5 points—as "a vast wasteland"?

ANSWER: TELEVISION or TV

B. The 1995 book Teenage Wasteland looks at the legend of—for 10 points—what British rock band?

ANSWER: The WHO

C. T. S. Eliot originally intended to give his poem The Waste Land a different title; for 15 points—what seven-word title, a quotation from Dickens's Our Mutual Friend which is also a song by The Loud Family?

ANSWER: HE DO THE POLICE IN DIFFERENT VOICES

 

(Fine Arts)

Bonus: 8. The Cardinal Classic is a timed tournament. Answer the following relevant questions, for 10 points each:

A. Painter René Magritte placed a train engine emerging out of a fireplace in what 1939 canvas?

ANSWER: TIME TRANSFIXED (accept la DUREE POINARDEE)

B. Recently-deceased British composer Sir Michael Tippett first won wide acclaim with what 1941 oratorio?

ANSWER: A CHILD OF OUR TIME

C. What song written by Herman Hupfeld in 1931 became much more famous eleven years later when performed by Arthur "Dooley" Wilson in Casablanca?

ANSWER: AS TIME GOES BY

 

(Religion-Myth-Classics)

Bonus: 9. In the Roman Catholic Church, three separate things make up what is known as "last rites" of the church. Name these, for 15 points each:

A. A Latin word denoting a "provision for a journey," this is communion given the dying by a priest.

ANSWER: the VIATICUM

B. The chief Biblical text for this sacrament is James 5:14-15.

ANSWER: ANNOINTING OF THE SICK or EXTREME UNCTION

[Note: the last rites begin with a last confession]

(Literature)

Bonus: 10. 30-20-10. Identify the animal from literature.

30: In the Chinese folk novel Journey to the West, he is a rogue who encounters spirits, demons, and ogres. In the famous English translation by Arthur Waley, he is the title character.

20: In the Indian epic Ramayana (pronounced REY-mah-yah-nah), general Hanuman (pronounced HAH-noo-main) and king Sugriva (pronounced soo-GREE-vuh) are two examples.

10: In a W. W. Jacobs story, a mummified hand of one brings curses in the form of unexpected fulfillment of a family’s wishes.

ANSWER: MONKEY

(Geography)

Bonus: 11. For 10 points apiece—in what city would you find the main campus of the following universities?

A. West Virginia University

ANSWER: MORGANTOWN

B. Western Michigan University

ANSWER: KALAMAZOO

C. University of West Florida

ANSWER: PENSACOLA

 

(History)

Bonus: 12. Identify the following relating to the conclusion of the War of Austrian Succession, for the stated number of points:

A. For 5 points each—the name of the American phase of the war and the 1748 treaty that ended it and the rest of the war.

ANSWER: KING GEORGE'S War and The Treaty of AIX-LA-CHAPELLE

B. For 10 points each—the two major colonial prizes which the English and French swapped in the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle. One was a fortress in Nova Scotia, the other a city in India.

ANSWER: The fortress of LOUISBOURG on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia and MADRAS, India

 

(Social Science)

Bonus: 13. Given a pair of psychologists, identify the school with which they are most associated, for 10 points each.

A. Wilhelm Wundt and Edward B. Titchener

ANSWER: STRUCTURALism

B. Max Wertheimer and Wolfgang Köhler

ANSWER: GESTALT psychology

C. Carl Rogers and Abraham H. Maslow

ANSWER: HUMANISTic psychology

(Sports)

Bonus: 14. For the stated number of points—given the year and team, name the NBA rookie of the year.

A. For 5 points—1996-97, Philadelphia 76ers

ANSWER: Allen IVERSON

B. For 10 points—1986-87, Indiana Pacers

ANSWER: Chuck PERSON

C. For 15 points—1976-77, Buffalo Braves

ANSWER: Adrian DANTLEY

 

(Geography)

Bonus: 15. For 10 points each—identify the following men involved in the exploration of the North American Northwest:

A. This Danish captain was commissioned in 1724 by Peter the Great to determine whether or not Asia and North America were connected by land.

ANSWER: Vitus (Jonassen) BERING

B. In 1786 this Russian explorer discovered the islands that now bear his name; they are valuable seal hunting grounds, and led to the formation of the Russian-American Company.

ANSWER: Gerasim PRIBYLOV

C. In 1793 this explorer led the first overland trip across the American Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean.

ANSWER: Sir Alexander MACKENZIE

 

(Science)

Bonus: 16. 30-20-10. Identify the scientist/inventor.

30: His fascination with computers began when he worked on the UNIVAC I. This eventually led him to found Control Data Corp. in 1957.

20: In 1972 he left CDC to form a new, eponymous company which would focus on building specialized computers. Their 1985 model required special Flourinert cooling.

10: His company’s supercomputers fill universities and government research operations around the world.

ANSWER: Seymour R. CRAY

 

(Current Events)

Bonus: 17. On 19 October 1997, the leader of a militant Islamic group called for a cooling off period. For 10 points each—name this group, which was behind two recent suicide bombings in Israel, its current leader, and the U.S. Special Envoy to the Middle East who is attempting to forge a stronger cease fire out of the cooling off period.

ANSWER: HAMAS, Sheik Ahmed YASSIN, and Dennis ROSS

 

(Science)

Bonus: 18. Identify these related pairs from evolutionary science; on each question you’ll receive 5 points for getting half of the pair, and 15 points for getting both:

A. Adjectives denoting similar structures due to similar ancestry (like human arms and bird wings) or similar conditions (like butterfly wings and bird wings) (in order).

ANSWER: HOMOLOGY and ANALOGY

B. Nouns, combined in a phrase due to Ernst Haeckel, denoting the evolutionary development of a species and the actual life development of an individual (in order).

ANSWER: PHYLOGENY and ONTOGENY

(History)

Bonus: 19. 30-20-10. Identify the nation from historical clues.

30: Among other reasons, Germany’s objection to increasing French influence here resulted in the 1906 Conference at Algeciras.

20: Another crisis here occurred in 1911, when the German gunboat Panther arrived at Agadir in an attempt to cow the French.

10: In 1912, the sultan of only three years called on the French for help. In exchange for their help, the sultan was forced to agree to his country becoming a French protectorate with capital at Rabat.

ANSWER: Kingdom of MOROCCO

 

(Sports)

Bonus: 20. There were, of course, ten World Series played in the decade of the 1950s,but they produced only four different winning managers. For 10 points apiece—name any three.

ANSWER: Casey STENGEL, Leo DUROCHER, Walter ALSTON, and Fred HANEY

(History)

 

Bonus: 21. The notorious "Plumbers" unit that carried out the Watergate break-in was formed by President Nixon in June 1971 to "plug leaks."

A. This was a manifestation of the administration's anger over-publication by the New York Times of—for 5points—what leaked documents?

ANSWER: The PENTAGON PAPERS

B. One of the Plumbers' pre-Watergate operations was to burgle the offices of psychiatrist Lewis Fielding, looking for information that could be used to smear—for 10 points—what leaker of The Pentagon Papers?

ANSWER: Daniel J. ELLSBERG

C. The Plumbers unit was supervised—for 15 points—by what chief domestic affairs adviser to the President, who eventually did 18 months in prison for Watergate-related crimes?

ANSWER: John D(aniel) EHRLICHMAN

 

(Current Events)

Bonus: 22. In January 1998, internal documents discussing teenager-aimed cigarette campaigns became available from one of America’s largest tobacco companies. For 15 points each--

A. Name this company, the creator of the Joe Camel campaign.

ANSWER: R. J. REYNOLDS Tobacco Company (also accept RJR NABISCO, Inc.)

B. Marketing memoranda from the 1970s show that the Reynolds Joe Camel campaign was specifically designed to lure "younger smokers" away from what then-leading teen brand made by Philip Morris?

ANSWER: MARLBOROs

(History)

Bonus: 23. For 10 points apiece—identify these Mexican national heroes:

A. The priest whose 1810 Grito de Dolores sparked the revolt for independence from Spain, though he himself was executed the following year.

ANSWER: Miguel HIDALGO y Costilla

B. The liberal president (1858-1863) during the War of the Reform and leader of the resistance against the Emperor Maximilian.

ANSWER: Benito (Pablo) JUÁREZ

C. He declared himself president of Mexico in 1910 and helped incite the Mexican Revolution by calling for armed resistance to dictatorship in his Plan of San Luis Potosí.

ANSWER: Francisco (Indalécio) MADERO

 

(Literature)

Bonus: 24. "On or about December, 1910, human character changed." For 15 points apiece—

A. Name the British writer who, in 1924, thus announced her belief that literature written before that date was largely obsolete.

ANSWER: (Adeline) Virginia (née Stephen) WOOLF

B. The occasion for the quote was an essay attacking the work of what other writer, whose masterpiece was 1908's The Old Wives’ Tale?

ANSWER: (Enoch) Arnold BENNETT

 

(Literature)

Bonus: 25. In honor of this being a Valentine's Day weekend tournament . . . for 5 points per answer—

A. Name the men married by Meg, Jo, and Amy March in Little Women.

ANSWER: John BROOKE, Fritz BHAER, Theodore LAURENCE or LAURIE (accept either name)

B. Name the men married by Jane, Elizabeth, and Lydia Bennet in Pride and Prejudice.

ANSWER: Charles BINGLEY, Fitzwilliam DARCY, George WICKHAM

 

(Fine Arts)

Bonus: 26. Russian composers seem to be often inspired by art. For 10 points each—given an artist and a composer, name the work by the composer inspired by the artist.

A. Victor Hartmann and Modest Mussorgsky

ANSWER: PICTURES FROM AN EXHIBITION

B. Arnold Böcklin and Sergey Rachmaninoff

ANSWER: The ISLE OF THE DEAD, op. 29

C. William Hogarth and Igor Stravinsky

ANSWER: The RAKE'S PROGRESS

(Current Events)

Bonus: 27. Time to test your Unabomber knowledge. Ten points per answer – don’t blow it.

A. From where did Ted Kaczynski receive his Ph.D.?

ANSWER: HARVARD University

B. What is the title of the Unabomber’s manifesto?

ANSWER: INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY AND ITS FUTURE

C. What is the name of the federal judge who presided over Kaczynski’s trial?

ANSWER: U.S. District Judge Garland BURRELL

 

(Science)

Bonus: 28. You have a spherical mirror of focal length 20 centimeters. For 15 points each—

A. What is the radius of curvature of the mirror?

ANSWER: 40 centimeters

B. If an object is placed on the axis of the mirror 30 centimeters away, and an image appears, how for in front of the mirror does it appear?

ANSWER: 60 centimeters

 

(Social Science)

Bonus: 29. Listen closely to the following definitions: The first is wrongful and unlawful conduct interfering with the performance of official duty. The second is the improper doing of an act that one might lawfully do. And the third is neglect or refusal of a distinct legal duty. For 10 points each—what, in order, are these three terms of law?

ANSWER: MALFEASANCE, MISFEASANCE, and NONFEASANCE

 

 

Science)

Bonus: 14. For 10 points each—identify the following related geologic terms:

A. The name for a layer of permeable rock which is wholly or partly filled with water.

ANSWER: AQUIFER

B. The name for completely full aquifer separated from the surface by a layer of relatively impermeable rock.

ANSWER: ARTESIAN aquifer or CONTROLLED aquifer

C. The term for the percent of the volume of an aquifer which is empty space and thus permeable to water.

ANSWER: POROSITY